pexels-kulbir-11079217
pexels-kulbir-11079217
pexels-kulbir-11079217
TOPIC Structures of oppression, historical contextualization, and social system
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TOPIC Structures of oppression, historical contextualization, and social system
TOPIC Structures of oppression, historical contextualization, and social systems (patriarchy and women's rights, working mothers, childcare, etc.), gender, and Bodies: size/ability/age (how women's bodies are objectified and toxic femininity). This Research paper is a scholarly essay. A scholarly paper reflecting on topics examined during the course will enable you to critically engage with theorizing what it means to be self-reflective in theory and practice. In this paper, you will illustrate the application of reflexive social work. To do so, you must reflect upon your own social positionality. It is up to your discretion how and where you enable this self-reflection. For example, it may appear in the introduction and be revisited in the conclusion. Or if it is a part of your evidence, it may appear throughout the paper. The goal is to critically engage with yourself not as the “triumphant answer” but rather, as a means to understand ourselves in relation to other humans in a field that is about practice. INSTRUCTIONS Write a 12- to 14-page paper addressing the following topic: Structures of oppression, historical contextualization, and social systems (patriarchy and women's rights, working mothers, childcare, etc.), gender, and Bodies: size/ability/age (how women's bodies are objectified and toxic femininity). This paper is about the challenges of working mothers, the discrimination they experience (as a result of patriarchal society), women objectification, toxic femininity, and oppression of women (with a focus on the working-class single mother). Your paper should use correct grammar and proper APA (7th edition) formatting (double-spaced, 1-inch margins all around, and 12-point Times New Roman font). Include the following components: An introduction with a research question A clearly defined problem A clear, concise thesis statement (i.e., what you intend to demonstrate as a result of your problem definition) A literature review of the problem A discussion section in which you critically analyze the results of your literature review. It is here that you substantiate the conclusions that you draw from your analysis, which supports your thesis. This is also where you bring in course learning materials. A conclusion section You are required to engage with a minimum of six readings from the course (attached are several to choose from). This may be accomplished by directly quoting readings that substantiate your claims/thesis and summarizing and articulating specific concepts from the reading that further your analysis. Use of the readings must show your mastery of the text and ability to apply the text to your own original argument. Be sure to use proper APA (7th edition) citations and references throughout, including a separate reference page (this page doesn’t count towards the required 12-14 pages). Support your claims through evidence. A strong research paper will substantiate the analysis by examining specific evidence and/or drawing upon the course reading. You may use a case study (if it is from your clinical experiences, make sure to make all information anonymous), draw upon a case sample from the reading, draw upon testimonials, discuss a policy and link it to everyday practice, and/or draw upon data. You must at minimum consult with at least two outside scholarly sources (journal articles or books). If you are unsure what counts for credit, consult with the professor/instructor. News articles/blogs/media reports/Wikipedia do not count as scholarly texts. Readings from the course (must include at least six of these): Stop the False Race/Gender Divide: A Call to Action (attached) Unraveling the Gender Knot (attached) How I Got My Wings (attached) Pigskin, Patriarchy, and Pain (attached) Exploring Male Privilege: A Journey of Two White Middle-Class Men (attached) "One Is Not Born a Woman (attached) Feminism: A movement to end sexist oppression (attached) From Pink Frilly Dresses to ‘One of the Boys’: A Social-Cognitive Analysis of Gender Identity Development and Gender Bias (attached) Heterosexism Hurts Everyone: https://goodmenproject.com/featured-content/heterosexism-hurts-everyone-wcz/ Masculinity as Homophobia: Fear, Shame, and Silence in the Construction of Gender Identity (attached) Understanding and Experiencing Class Privilege (attached) Race, Wealth, and Equality (attached) Cycle of Socialization (attached) The Complexity of Identity (attached)

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