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pexels-kulbir-11079217
pexels-kulbir-11079217
The purpose of this assignment is to facilitate your learning about an important
Home » International Affairs/Relations  »  The purpose of this assignment is to facilitate your learning about an important
The purpose of this assignment is to facilitate your learning about an important
The purpose of this assignment is to facilitate your learning about an important global issue, to encourage you to view the world through a new perspective, and to further your research, writing, and communication skills. The assignment requires you to write a policy paper from a particular country’s perspective, which you will use for a class simulation of international negotiations to address the problem of climate change. POSC 107 Introduction to International Relations Working Paper Assignment Due April 19th, 2021 The purpose of this assignment is to facilitate your learning about an important global issue, to encourage you to view the world through a new perspective, and to further your research, writing, and communication skills. The assignment requires you to write a policy paper from a particular country’s perspective, which you will use for a class simulation of international negotiations to address the problem of climate change. Government leaders have developed several major treaties designed to address the issue of climate change, the latest of which is the Paris Accord. Signatories to the agreement have pledged to lower their greenhouse gas emissions, to increase their ability to adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change, and to provide the funds necessary to achieve those aims. There are problems with the Paris Accord, however. First, experts agree that the agreement does not go far enough to reign in the rise in global temperatures. Second, countries pledge their emissions reductions targets voluntarily, and there are no consequences to breaking their pledges. Already, many countries are failing to meet their self-imposed targets. Third, industrialized states are not fulfilling their promised contributions to climate finance. These problems raise the following questions, which governments debate at ongoing global climate change negotiations: Is it necessary to increase states’ greenhouse gas reductions commitments? Should the Paris Accord be modified to force state compliance? How should this be done? Is a greater level of funding necessary to achieve emissions reductions and climate adaptation goals? Where should this funding come from, and how should it be distributed? For this assignment, you must conduct research in order to determine what your country’s positions are on the above questions, and then communicate those positions through a working paper. Working papers are summary documents that outline a country’s position on the problem and make proposals on what should be done to address that problem (see Appendix A for a sample). Working papers are due April 19th on Blackboard. They must be 500-700 words in length and use at least five sources, one of which must be academic (book or peer-reviewed journal) and four of which must be legitimate news sources. You may also use additional credible sources (government websites; international organization websites; etc). All sources must be cited with a bibliography included using APA style format. You will be graded on: • Finding and utilizing at least 5 required sources • Presenting an appropriate, evidence-based country position with clear and specific policy proposals • Including appropriate in-text citations • Including appropriate bibliography Appendix A: Sample Working Paper Topic: Country: Delegate: Stopping the Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons The Federal Republic of Germany Ulrich Metz As Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier stated in 2016, Germany’s non-nuclear vows are “unambiguous and forever” (Steinmeier, 2016). Our non-nuclear status has been a requirement since the Two-Plus-Four agreement that paved the way for reunification in 1990 (Hachoff, 2013). In 2017, Germany remains a fervent advocate of the non-nuclear regime and is completely convinced that there is a further need for more systematic and progressive efforts toward nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation. German citizens believe nuclear weapons are more of a liability than an asset and they affirm that promoting nonproliferation and disarmament means promoting German national interest (Hoffman & Longhurst, 2009). Our policies are determined by basic principles: we want to strengthen cooperative relationships with our economic partners in the world to promote democracy, free trade, and human rights (Fischer & Schlender, 2017). Germany is not a military power with global commitment. As a signatory of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) and adherents to the Chemical and Biological Weapons Bans, we expect the continued protection under the NATO and U.S. nuclear umbrella but recognize that the NPT does not preclude a European Union with nuclear capability (Haftendron, 2011). However, Germany will never co-possess nuclear weapons, and in this context, we propose global, multilateral approaches to the nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction that will achieve nuclear disarmament and not merely conduct “good faith” negotiations: 1) Not only should existing treaties for the nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction be modified to force compliance but new principles in the NPT should be implemented to promote elimination of nuclear weapons. 2) Globally agreed upon sanctions should be brought against those who do not comply with the modifications. New principles should be implemented that further enhance nonproliferation: a) Require all nuclear states to place all fissile materials under international safeguards, similar to the principle we unsuccessfully tried to implement in the 1995 NPT extension. b) Establish a convention banning production of fissile materials for no-peaceful purposes and challenge the U.S.-Russian position that the cut off verification regime must not require IAEA full-scope safeguards. It is illogical that IAEA monitors all plutonium in non-weapon states under the NPT while the cut off allows declared and undeclared to get away with less (Jenkins, 2014). 3) A global, multilateral approach to structuring a convention for a Global Zero Treaty for Weapons of Mass Destruction should be founded, which would lead to an eventual ban on the productions, use, and threat of all nuclear biological and chemical weapons. 4) All new treaties and/or modifications to treaties should include a call for the building of institutions and structures that will promote economic and security cooperation in this increasingly interdependent world. Bibliography Fischer, J., & Schlender, Y. (2017, May 3). Merkel embraces liberal order. Die Welt, p. 4A. Hachoff, R. (2013, September 23). Germany promotes nuclear non-proliferation. Washington Post, p. 3B. Haftendron, A. (2021, May 11). The End of Arms Control as We Know It. https://www.vox.com/world/21131449/trump-putin-nuclear-usa-russia-arms-control-new-start Hoffman, M., & Longhurst, N. (2009, December 15). German citizens reject nuclear weapons. New York Times, p. 1A. Jenkins, P. (2014). Promoting better nuclear transparency. Journal of Denuclearization, 13(4): 9- 31. Steinmeier, F. (2016, January 6). Foreign Office Statement on Nuclear Power. German Federal Foreign Office. https://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/en

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