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pexels-kulbir-11079217
pexels-kulbir-11079217
please provide a reading response to post from the view of a psych nurse student
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please provide a reading response to post from the view of a psych nurse student
please provide a reading response to post from the view of a psych nurse student to peers. Please do not summarize, give a insightful discussion post with 3 citations. please do not use citations listed belo. Psychoeducation in Mental Health Including Psychoeducation into The Treatment Plan Psychoeducation is regarded as the process involved in teaching patients dealing with mental illness as well as their relatives regarding the nature of sickness, consequences, etiology, consequences, treatment, prognosis, and alternative remedies (Sarkhel et al., 2020). Psychoeducation helps to provide systematic, broad, and relevant information regarding illness, diagnosis, and treatment. The programs provide information specific to disease and give the tools for early recognition as well as management of relapse. In addition, it gives information related to genetic implications and general information such as skills training, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and problem-solving. Psychoeducation also integrates information regarding how to live with illness to family members to understand the impact of illness (Motlova et al., 2017). Essentially, psychoeducation helps to provide patients with the appropriate tools to manage mental illnesses. There are different psychoeducation strategies that can be integrated into the treatment plan when providing routine care to patients. One important consideration is to determine the ideal setting to educate patients and families. Sarkhel et al. (2020) reported that psychoeducation can be delivered individually, in the family, group, or community setting. In addition, psychoeducation can also be categorized as compliance/adherence focused, rehabilitation focused, or treatment focused. In routine care, it is important to adopt different approaches based on convenience. In the family setting, this can be achieved when patients come in with their support system (family) and engage them in education. Sarkhel et al. (2020) surmised that the family psychoeducation setting involves integrating single families or grouping families that have similar types of illnesses. Family-based psychoeducation is ideal in handling severe mental illnesses. In the community setting, education can be delivered in outreach settings while in the individual setting, this is possible during patient consultations. In addition, studies noted that another strategy in psychoeducation is active psychoeducation which involves active interaction of the therapist with patients and their families thus facilitating clarification and interaction. On the other hand, passive psychoeducation involves the provision of materials to patients as well as family members. The materials could be in the form of audio/visual material, pamphlets, among others that the family members and patients ought to read and assimilate on their own. In a busy clinical setting, clinicians utilize such methods (Sarkhel et al., 2020). It is also important to integrate active and passive psychoeducation. Active psychoeducation is ideal because of its comprehensiveness but it requires time and skilled workforce. Passive psychoeducation is advantageous because it is less time-consuming and cost-effective. In the group setting, psychoeducation would be delivered to individuals facing similar illnesses. Sarkhel et al. (2020) reported that group psychoeducation involves grouping patients with similar types of illnesses. For example, patients with substance abuse, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia could be grouped together. It is undesirable to form groups with members that have different illnesses. In the different psychoeducation strategies, it is possible to utilize different approaches including the information, skills training, and supportive models. Sarkhel et al. (2020) reported that the information model typically focuses on furnishing families with knowledge regarding psychiatric illness and various management strategies. Srivastava and Panday (2017) noted that the information model emphasizes the provision of families with knowledge regarding psychiatric illnesses and their management. The aim of the approach is to enhance the awareness of families regarding illness and assist with patient management. The information model can be applied when dealing with individuals, communities, and families. The skills training model involves developing various skills to enable families to manage illnesses more effectively (Sarkhel et al., 2020). The skills training model seeks to systematically establish specific behavior to enable family members to enhance their abilities in assisting their family members and managing illnesses more effectively (Srivastava & Panday, 2017). The supportive model involves integrating support groups in engaging family members to share feelings (Sarkhel et al., 2020). The supportive model involves an approach that applies support groups that engage patients’ families through sharing of experiences and feelings. The key objective is to enhance the emotional capabilities of families and improve their coping mechanisms when providing care to ill relatives (Srivastava & Panday, 2017). The comprehensive model utilizes a combination of the various models (Sarkhel et al., 2020). The comprehensive model involves a combination of the information, supportive, and skill training model. At the initial stages, participants are given lectures regarding the illness. In addition, they participate in multi-family support groups and eventually participate individually in one-on-one sessions with a mental health professional (Srivastava & Panday, 2017). Evidently, the inclusion of psychoeducation into the treatment regimen will involve a multipronged strategy. It is imperative to be adaptable to different situations. For example, if the opportunity presents itself, it is important to engage in psychoeducation in a one-on-one session with a patient or the family setting if the patient support system is available. It is ineffective to use a single approach for every situation. References Motlova, L. B., Balon, R., Beresin, E. V., Brenner, A. M., Coverdale, J. H., Guerrero, A. P., ... & Roberts, L. W. (2017). Psychoeducation as an opportunity for patients, psychiatrists, and psychiatric educators: Why do we ignore it? Academic Psychiatry, 41(4), 447-451. Sarkhel, S., Singh, O. P., & Arora, M. (2020). Clinical practice guidelines for psychoeducation in psychiatric disorders general principles of psychoeducation. Indian journal of psychiatry, 62(2), S319. Srivastava, P., & Panday, R. (2017). Psychoeducation an effective tool as treatment modality in mental health. The International Journal of Indian Psychology, 4(1), 123-130.

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